Blog Archives

24 Mar '12

Williams Selyem (Sonoma)

Williams Selyem Winery makes high-end single-vineyard Pinot Noir wines from a variety of sites in and around Sonoma County, California. Their core philosophy has always been to keep the winemaking simple in order to let the vineyard site speak for itself. True to this goal, Flow Films produced a series of short films on each of the vineyards from where…

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22 Aug '13

Viña Casa Silva (Chile)

The Silva family pioneered grapegrowing in the Colchagua Valley with the first vineyards back in 1892. ‘s cellar is the oldest in the valley. They strive to innovate in their vineyards and to pioneer new terroirs in the Colchagua Valley. Also, they are paving the way for Carmenere by investing in research studies in their vineyards to study clones and…

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21 Aug '13

The New Chile

Chile stretches more than 2,880 miles from north to south, and just 265 miles east to west at its widest point. Chile’s natural boundaries include the Pacific Ocean, Andes Mountain, and the Atacama Desert.
Vine Connections is a Sausalito, California-based importer and the exclusive U.S. representative of some of the world’s most unique and exciting wines of Chile, Argentina, California,…

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24 Mar '12

Cognac: The Art of Blending (France)

Cognac has long held a reputation for being a drink consumed by old men sitting by the fireplace, perhaps with a cigar in hand. Working with the BNIC, Flow Films looked at this historic drink through a modern lens – injecting renewed spirit into the iconic beverage.
The film follows mixologists Marcos Tello and Kyle Branche who blend Cognac into…

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14 Mar '12

The Scent of Black (France)

Hilly and remote Cahors, tucked away in the corner of Southwest France, has been producing wines made from the Malbec grape for centuries.
The region is also famous for black truffles. The same poor limestone soil that is responsible for such acclaimed wines also produces the tuber melanosporum. It’s not surprising that the inky wines of Cahors and earthy black…

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24 Mar '12

Austrian Wine – A Taste of Culture

This small country (almost the size of Maine), produces some of the highest-quality wines in the world. Lower Austria, Burgenland, Styria, and Vienna – The Austrian Wine Marketing Board commissioned Flow Films to produce a series of short films highlighting each of these five winegrowing regions, in addition to film guides about the country’s classic food pairings, history, geography, and…

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24 Mar '12

The Comté Experience (France)

From grilled cheese to cheese puffs, soufflé to fondue, Comté is one of France’s most well-known, popular and most versatile cheeses. It’s still made in a 1,000-year-old tradition, and was the first cheese to receive protected regional status by the Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC). Yet despite France’s devotion to this delicious dairy product, it remains fairly obscure outside the country.…

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24 Mar '12

Stewards of the Land (Sonoma)

There is a growing, world-wide movement to reform our dependency on over-processed, pre-packaged fast foods, with emphasis placed on handmade products from small producers. The Russian River Valley (located in Sonoma County, California) is on the front lines of this change. ”Stewards of the Land” looks at a few of the key figures who have transformed Sonoma County from green…

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21 Aug '13

Clos des Fous (Chile)

Clos des Fous is about four friends – four crazy guys who have chosen to ignore the “experts” about where to plant vineyards and to trust their own instincts. The team is viticulturist Paco Leyton, winemaker Francois Massoc, terroir hunter Pedro Parra, and “bringer of wisdom” Albert Cussen. Clos des Fous, at its heart, is a project dedicated to finding…

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24 Mar '12

Murcia: Soul of a Land (Spain)

Murcia – a dry, hot region in southeast Spain – is known for its abundant produce and Calasparra rice (used for making paella). But this is only part of the story. Murcia’s culinary traditions reflect the transformative presence of centuries of foreign invaders – Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Moors. There is Roman influence here, as well; it was the Romans who…

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